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Cres

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Hello beautiful people,

 

does anyone still come here? I hope the ghost of Jayrock still lingers. Hoping to have anyone chime in on the design below:

 

http://ca.pcpartpicker.com/user/Cres/saved/3v448d

 

Putting things in context, I've been using the same PC for almost a decade and I'm looking to do an upgrade to last me another 5 years at least, understanding that through those 5 years my video settings will progressively go from "max" to "low" over time. Having not put together a PC in so long, I basically had to re-learn the hardware market piece by piece, which is what I've been doing online for the last 6 hours. I'm particularly interested in the following kind of feedback:

 

- Any key feature or technology that I've missed but I'm likely to want/need in the next, say 1-3 years?

- Any missed opportunities to save some dough by going for a slightly lower quality part for substantial reductions in price?

- I'm still agonizing over the i5 3570k vs i7 3770k debate. On one hand the 3770 probably achieves my goal of being worry-free for 5 years a bit better, on the other the 3570 seems like clearly superior bang for the buck

- Any glaring mistake on my part due to having been away from the PC modding scene for so long?

 

Appreciate anything you can throw my way. Thanks!

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I'd like to add a question:

 

We were discussing what version of Windows to get. I have an Xbox One, so Windows 8 seems like a logical choice just for the media options, but would Windows 7 be enough if not? I mean, I expect it will be supported for many, many years.

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I'm in the same boat as you.  PC 10+ years old, looking to get a new one and way out of touch with what is available.  I was looking a few months ago to get my feet wet and was a little overwhelmed.  Looking at your build, the only thing I can comment on is your mobo choice.  Asrock is essentially a low end Asus brand.  I would think about going with a Gigabyte, Asus or the like instead.

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Thanks for the feedback. I swapped it for a Z77X-UD3H from GB, after researching it... does seem like better stability for a similar price range.

 

*edit -- The UD3H doesn't seem to be in stock in most places, looks like it's a bit dated at this point. There's the UD5H, obviously, but none of its advantages matter to me and it's 75$ more.

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I have both Windows 7 and 8 for different computers.  While I hate that W8 took me days to set up to my liking, it's probably the better option since when the new DirectX version comes out it has a possibility of being Windows 8 only.

 

As far as the Mobo like RiceJ mentioned I'd go with a better brand, personally my Gigabyte has given me no issues.

 

CPU should be fine and you don't need to splurge on an i7 unless you are into more than just gaming.  I still use my "puny" i5-2500k with a GTX 680 and the CPU is rarely the thing to hold me back.  More and more games are GPU dependent anyway.

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I built my current computer 6 years ago, originally with a $220 video card that could handle just about all modern games of the time at max settings (save maybe for Crysis 16xAA or something). That card died 2 years ago by whatever chance and I replaced it with a card that actually performs better than the old one but cost only $110 by the time I bought it, which I'm happy with. Having virtually no knowledge of benchmarks or reviews for the modern wave of video cards, I'm just pointing this out to you in case it saves you money in the long run to go with a cheaper card now. Though I see newegg gives a free copy of Watchdogs with the one you've picked so maybe you've decided it evens out?

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If you're buying a new Windows license, absolutely buy Windows 8.  It's ugly but is an incredible OS under the hood.  There is no reason to get a video card like that to future proof.  It's cheaper to buy a 750ti 2GB (or a 760 2GB) now, then replace it with a modern card in 3 years if you still want to go that direction.  They don't make socket 1155 mobos anymore, you're better off going with a modern Z97 socket 1150 mobo and a Haswell chip (the refresh, i5-4690K, just came out two days ago)

 

You also don't need 16GB ram unless you're going to run virtual machines or do video editing, and can scale back the PSU to a 550W or even 450W if you downgrade the gfx card

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Appreciate the feedback but I need to challenge you on the elements, otherwise I'm just flying blind:

 

- Why do you say that about the video card? It's not the 780, which is unreasonably priced. If I go with a cheaper card I won't survive 5 years, and if the plan is to just buy a new video card in 3 years, well... I'm just procrastinating at that point. 3 years from now I'll be faced with the same choice of spending either 400$ to last another 5, or 200$ to last 3 and spend 200$ again 3 years later. If I spend 400 now I last the 5 years and for the first 18-24 months I can run everything through the roof.

- Finding a socket 1155 motherboard isn't that hard, some websites still have some options, but it's good to know they don't make them anymore because I did notice availability was scarce. Everything I read about the Haswell said that its architecture is designed to benefit certain types of activities, gaming not being one of them. Also, Haswell chips just run universally hotter / power hungry, which indirectly impacts the lifespan of the PC.

- Isn't telling me I don't need 16gb of RAM the same as telling someone 5 years ago he doesn't need 4gb of RAM? Eventually, everyone needs any amount of RAM...

- Why is scaling back the PSU even an objective? They're practically the same price...

 

Again, I have to challenge your points to understand them. I'm open to making changes to the build if it's for an educated reason.

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Regarding the 770: It's more for multimonitor, >1080p, or 3D gaming.  The 760 will max 98% of what you throw at it already, and the next generation of games are going to be consistently hamstrung by developers for the already out-of-date PS4 and Xbox One.  I think you will max out games for at least 3 years, if not more, with a 760 2GB.

 

Socket 1155 motherboards may be easy to find, but they're objectively worse than a comparable Z97 product.  You're buying a new computer motherboard that's 2 generations old and you're not saving any money doing it.

 

Haswell does run hot, but it contains the latest and greatest in CPU instructions/pipelines and new software is being built from the ground up to take advantage of it.  Devil's Canyon is literally brand new as of three days ago and apparently overclocks like a beast.  You're buying a 212 evo so you shouldn't care.  Your CPU will probably never get above 50c, which is less than half of what it would take to damage anything in the computer.  The only component of your computer that can damage other components is your power supply.

 

The phrase "anyone needs any amount of RAM" may be technically correct, but you will never use more than 8GB on a 2014 machine unless you're doing virtualization or video editing.  If you need to run a Sharepoint 2013 server on a guest OS, then you can upgrade easily.  For reference, most people still do not need more than 4gb of RAM and over provisioning has no effect.  I'm staging an application server and a database from the computer I'm posting on now, with like 40 chrome tabs open, and I'm only using 2.7GB. 

 

Scaling back the PSU is just an opportunity that you have.  I don't think it uses any more power or runs any less efficiently to overprovision, and don't know prices on them

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Good choice going with windows 8 with your longevity goal. Windows 7 support is set to end 2016. On another note, I have found software development lags hardware in most cases. I find buying a generation behind you are usually at 50% of the cost or less. This allows me to upgrade sooner so my hardware is not lagging behind software and technology advances for the same price or close too longevity proofing. It really comes done to life cycle management and looking at how you will spend dollars over the next 1o years or longer. You should use the same methodology for all your major purchases, cars, tv, he'll even vacations. You will budget more efficiently and find satisfaction with them. Just my thoughts.

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